Tag Archives: John Lasseter

Cars 2

5 Jul

Title: Cars 2
Year: 
2011
Director: 
John Lasseter, co-directed by Brad Lewis
Writer: Ben Queen, based on a story by John Lasseter, Brad Lewis and Dan Fogelman
Starring: 
Owen Wilson, Larry the Cable Guy, Michael Caine, Emily Mortimer, Jason Isaacs, Thomas Kretschmann, Eddie Izzard, Joe Mantegna, Tony Shalhoub, John Ratzenberger, John Turturro, Jeff Gordon, Lewis Hamilton, Vanessa Redgrave, Bonnie Hunt, Cheech Marin, Jeff Garlin
MPAA Rating: 
G
Runtime: 
106 min
Major Awards: –

IMDb Rating: 
6.6
Rotten Tomatoes: 
35%

Yes, it’s true, it happened. Pixar finally produced a film that’s just fine and not spectacular. And that really is saying something, by the way. We’re talking about the one studio with a perfect streak, 11 films ranging from 1995 to 2010 that range from masterpieces to incredibly good. Allow me to recap the history of those eleven films. The first was the one people know the most, obviously, Toy Story in 1995, the film that started the wonders of digital animation, the film every animated film since owes a lot to. 1998 saw A Bug’s Life, a far more ambitious project as far as scope for the company. 1999 was the year of Toy Story 2, to this date one of the most perfect sequels ever made, animated or not. Their first film of the new millennium was 2001’s Monsters, Inc. which was awesome but meant Pixar lost it’s first stab at the Best Animated Feature Oscar, a category it pretty much helped create. In 2003 they got that trophy though, as Finding Nemo enchanted audiences worldwide. They repeated the feat in 2004, as The Incredibles won it, marking another landmark in the history of the company as their first PG-13 rated outing.

In 2006 came the film this one is the sequel to, Cars, and that one didn’t win the Best Animated Feature Oscar, and was the first Pixar film I didn’t downright love, even though I still liked it a fair bit. After that little stumble (even though Cars would be considered a success for any other animation house) Pixar went back to its masterful streak, upping up its own ante every single time, with Ratatouille in 2007, Wall-E in 2008, Up in 2009 and Toy Story 3 last year. Those four films are insanely good, and all won those Best Animated Feature Oscars. A four-year streak, I’m afraid to guess, will end with this one, Cars 2. It’s not that this one was a horrible film, because it’s not that bad, it’s just that it doesn’t feel like a Pixar film at all to me. Let me just go ahead and name those eleven prior films I just recapped and next to them insert the grade I gave to them upon watching them: Toy Story (A+), A Bug’s Life (A-), Toy Story 2 (A+), Monsters Inc. (A), Finding Nemo (A), The Incredibles (A+), Cars (B+), Ratatouille (A), Wall-E (A+), Up (A+) and Toy Story 3 (A+).

So, you see, out of the eleven films Pixar has released I have awarded 6 of those, more than half, a perfect A+ grade, which means I consider them masterpieces, and only one of them, the original Cars, has a grade in the B-range, and even that was a strong B+. The fact that I love Pixar films as much as I do isn’t just because of their insane animation skills, because their films are the most visually dazzling always, but it’s actually moreso because of their even better skills as the best storytellers in the industry. You look at the stories the Pixar films tell and they’re all extremely great, every film has one genuinely emotional moment, true emotions and indelible characters. And that’s why I didn’t like Cars 2 as much, because even though the animation is still undeniable outstanding, the story it tells is generic at best, and maybe people are being too harsh on this film because they expect so much from Pixar, but hey, that’s the price you pay when you have a decade and a half of sheer perfection under your belt.

I won’t be as critical of the film as some others have been, and I’ll probably end up giving it a weak B or a strong B-, because I recognize that as an animated film it’s decent enough, even though as a Pixar one it sucks. But, in reality, Pixar or not, there are just too many things that are just plain wrong about this film, and I’ll jump on the most popular bandwagon amongst those who disliked the films to point out its biggest error: Mater. That’s the sidekick of Owen Wilson’s Lightning McQueen, voiced by Larry the Cable Guy, a dimwitted truck that in this sequel gets what every sidekick dreams of, their very own chance to own the spotlight. And what we find out here is the reason why sidekicks are never the center of focus in a movie, and why their adventures are relegated to straight-to-video entries, this is a character that just doesn’t work as a main one at all.

And it’s not as though Lightning McQueen isn’t around any more, and we do see quite a bit of his racing successes, but Mater has a fallout with him, followed by the immediate and necessary identity and crisis and after that he’s the main part of this film, as the film evolves into an unlikely spy caper flick with a dimwitted redneck truck as the protagonist next to cars voiced by the very cool Michael Caine and Emily Mortimer. There is a lot of gunfire in this one in the midst of some horrible accents and attempts at jokes (though some of those really do work), and I just didn’t get the film. I didn’t get the story Pixar was trying to tell with it, there’s an ecological side to it I guess with Eddie Izzard’s character but you just can’t connect with anything in it, and in a Pixar film you expect some seriously deep emotional connection.

I’m guessing that part of that lack of emotional connection is because these are talking cars in a world in which humans don’t exist. Yes, Toy Story had toys and Wall-E had robots and Finding Nemo had fish, but they were all definitely embedded into a very human reality and it meant we could connect. That’s just not the case in Cars 2, and even though the original Cars wasn’t different in that way it at least focussed on a much better character and not in Mater, a character which A.O. Scott of The New York Times has given the dubious and yet accurate distinction of naming as the Jar Jar Binks of the Pixar world.

I know why Pixar chose Cars to make their first sequel outside of the Toy Story series. And even though you hate to think Pixar does anything other than for purely genius and creative reasons, you gotta know they did it for money. The original movie has made nearly $10 billion in merchandise sales since its release over five years ago, which puts it right up there with Star Wars, Harry Potter and Pixar’s own Toy Story as a film that can sell anything with its name on it because kids will want the toy cars, the t-shirts, the backpacks, you name it. So of course from that point of view expanding the franchise with Cars 2 made sense, I just hope that now they have made that money-making move they will move on to their usual business of making animated masterpieces, and if the teaser for next summer’s Brave is any indication, they seem to be doing just that.

Grade: B

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Oscar Nominations: My Reactions

25 Jan

The Oscar nominations were announced bright and early this morning. And while most of the nominees were predictable, there were still quite a bit of storylines to take out of the morning’s announcements.

Firstly, of course, the outrageous snub of Christopher Nolan in the Best Director category, Inception might have made the Best Picture ballot and Mr. Nolan himself got his second career Screenplay nod, but the Academy yet again failed to mention him for Best Director to make room for the Coen brothers. Another snub was The Town, which ended up with a sole Oscar nomination and got snubbed in the Best Picture as well as Director and Screenplay races, the films nominated instead were still quite deserving, but still, too little love bestowed on such a great film.

Then, on a far more positive note, this was also the year in which films that came out of Sundance came out strong at the Oscars, which is terrific news for the independent film business, The Kids Are All Right and Winter’s Bone both got 4 nominations in major races, Animal Kingdom got a Best Supporting Actress bid, and four out of the five Best Documentary nominees were shown in Park City a year ago.

As for what the nominations will mean come the big night on February 27th, well, The King’s Speech certainly got a huge boost today, scoring an even dozen nominations, the most out of any film this year. That has some people jumping from The Social Network‘s bandwagon into the one driven by Harvey Weinstein, since for the last several decades the movie with the most nominations has won the Best Picture race 75% of the time. Now, let’s play statistics for a while here, I actually still think The Social Network will still win this for now, but the stock on The King’s Speech has certainly risen in the last few weeks. First, of course, was Saturday’s PGA win, and considering that association has bestowed its award to the eventual Best Picture winner 13 out of the last 20 years it means it has the odds going for it.

But then again, lets not forget just how much The Social Network has going for itself, it pretty much swooped the Critic’s groups awards, including big wins at the Globes and the National Board of Review. Not to mention that David Fincher is the clear front-runner to win not only the Best Director Oscar, but the DGA honors that will be announced on Saturday. And really, the Best Director winner is always considered the likely victor of the big race and, in fact, the winner of the DGA award has actually went on to have their film win the Best Picture Oscar 33 times in the last 40 years.

So, who really has the advantage? I honestly don’t know, this really is one seriously tough race to call, and I won’t call it until all the remained precursors are done with. Yes, the DGA will most likely go to The Social Network, but then the BAFTAs will presumably be all over The King’s Speech considering it’s a home-grown film. The PGA win by Tom Hooper’s film was big, yes, but so were the many Critic’s Associations and Globes wins by David Fincher’s movie. So, if I may interject, I think that the one awards show that may be a big indicator as to what will happen on Oscar night will be the SAGs, taking place this coming Sunday.

Hear me out for a while, the SAG obviously doesn’t have a Best Picture award, but rather a Best Ensemble one, meaning it will honor the combined acting performances of the cast in a film. And while I still think that the front-runner for that one is The Fighter (which has four seriously spectacular performances), I can see an upset happening courtesy of The King’s Speech. The Social Network won’t win that one, it has some great performances but it can’t compete acting-wise with those two other films, so that race will be the one to prove just how much support The King’s Speech has. And if it wins that one, then I probably will update my predictions and consider it the front-runner for the Oscar, because, remember, the SAGs have many times served as indicators of Oscar upsets, I’m obviously referring to 1998, when the SAG went to Shakespeare in Love, the same film that went on to win the Best Picture Oscar over the clear favorite, Saving Private Ryan, and most recently in 2005, when Crash ended up with the SAG win and ended up upsetting Brokeback Mountain for the Academy’s top honor.

So yes, this will be a Best Picture race for the ages, one I’m really excited for and one that will come down to the very end. Will The King’s Speech end up with the win? Consolidating itself as the biggest Oscar bait there ever was in 2010, a biopic about British monarchy counting with excellent performances all around and a spectacular director working form a brilliant script. Or, will The Social Network prevail? The film with very young up-and-coming actors, directed by a director that started out working on music videos and then went on to create some of the most masterful and popular films of the last decade and a half, one about a modern phenomenon and full of quick-witted, very fast and talkative scenes. It will be a New School vs. Old School battle to the very end, the historical dramas have fared very well in the past, I’m thinking Gandhi or The English Patient, but as of late, with winners like The Hurt Locker and No Country for Old Men, it feels as though the Academy is skewing more towards films oriented to younger audiences with a more gritty sort of feel. We’re in for one very entertaining race to the finish line.

But enough about the big race, I’m sure we’ll talk much more about that in the near future, but for now let us revise all the nominations announced by the Academy today.

BEST PICTURE

  • 127 Hours
  • Black Swan
  • The Fighter
  • Inception
  • The Kids Are All Right
  • The King’s Speech
  • The Social Network
  • Toy Story 3
  • True Grit
  • Winter’s Bone

All the usual suspects here. I went 9 for 10 as far as my predictions go, considering Winter’s Bone felt the love from the Academy big time today and crept into the big party, throwing out my original prediction for the tenth slot: The Town. Again, as for who will actually win it, I have no idea, it’s a big split between The Social Network and The King’s Speech, and we’ll have a clearer idea of the state of the race once the remaining precursors are all said and done.

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Darren Aronofsky (for Black Swan)
  • Ethan Coen and Joel Coen (for True Grit)
  • David Fincher (for The Social Network)
  • Tom Hooper (for The King’s Speech)
  • David O. Russell (for The Fighter)

I went 4 for 5 in this one, considering I predicted the horribly snubbed Christopher Nolan to be invited to the party instead of the Coen brothers. However, True Grit got a massive ten nominations and the love went to the genius brothers instead. Which was well deserved, but it’s ridiculous that Nolan doesn’t have a Best Director nomination to his name yet. However, massive kudos to Darren Aronofsky for finally getting his first career nomination for helming what to me was the best film of 2010.

BEST LEAD ACTOR

  • Javier Bardem (for Biutiful)
  • Jeff Bridges (for True Grit)
  • Jesse Eisenberg (for The Social Network)
  • Colin Firth (for The King’s Speech)
  • James Franco (for 127 Hours)

Went a perfect 5-for-5 in this race, correctly predicting Javier Bardem’s nomination over Get Low‘s Robert Duvall. Still, Bardem’s nomination was much deserved, and it was awesome to see a foreign language performance getting a nod here. However, this has never been a race, the golden man probably has Colin Firth’s name engraved from this very moment.

BEST LEAD ACTRESS

  • Annette Bening (for The Kids Are All Right)
  • Nicole Kidman (for Rabbit Hole)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (for Winter’s Bone)
  • Natalie Portman (for Black Swan)
  • Michelle Williams (for Blue Valentine)

Another category in which I went 5-for-5 in my predictions. And it really is a lovely bunch of ladies getting nominated here, Michelle Williams got her extremely deserved nomination for her beautiful work in Blue Valentine and Jennifer Lawrence capped off her breakthrough year with an invite to Hollywood’s biggest party. This is, though, still a Portman vs. Bening battle, and even though I think Portman has the edge because hers was the better performance in the better film, I’ll wait until the SAGs are done on Sunday to call her a lock.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • Christian Bale (for The Fighter)
  • John Hawkes (for Winter’s Bone)
  • Jeremy Renner (for The Town)
  • Mark Ruffalo (for The Kids Are All Right)
  • Geoffrey Rush (for The King’s Speech)

I predicted four out of the five here, the one I got wrong was Andrew Garfield who I thought would firmly land a nod but was bumped off by John Hawkes who was riding on the huge love given to Winter’s Bone here. Still, this is no contest, it’s Bale’s to lose, and he just won’t.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • Amy Adams (for The Fighter)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (for The King’s Speech)
  • Melissa Leo (for The Fighter)
  • Hailee Steinfeld (for True Grit)
  • Jacki Weaver (for Animal Kingdom)

I’ve always said this was my favorite race of the year, and even though my personal #2 pick, Mila Kunis, was left out, it really still is. I said that if Hailee Steinfeld remained here and wasn’t voted as Lead, then either Ms. Kunis or Jacki Weaver would get the boot, I picked Kunis in my predictions but apparently the Academy really loved the Australian crime saga and wanted to give it a nod, as they should have, really. Still, this is the best race there can be this year, considering I could see any of these ladies potentially winning. Amy Adams was my personal favorite of the year, and she gives her best performance yet, and considering it’s her third nomination they may (and hopefully will!) give it to her. Helena Bonham Carter may find herself winning if The King’s Speech sweeps. Melissa Leo is the current favorite, and if she wins the SAG on Sunday then this will be hers. Hailee Steinfeld carries True Grit and the voters may like to reward a young one. And Jacki Weaver created one seriously compelling character here, though considering she missed out at the SAG I think she’s the less likely to end up winning.

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • Another Year (written by Mike Leigh)
  • The Fighter (written by Scott Silver, Paul Tamasy and Eric Johnson)
  • Inception (written by Christopher Nolan)
  • The Kids Are All Right (written by Lisa Cholodenko and Stuart Blumberg)
  • The King’s Speech (written by David Seidler)

I went 4 for 5 in this one, and the one I missed was the one that pains me the most not to see here which was the beautiful Black Swan screenplay, which I had in favor of Another Year, but I guess you can never count Mike Leigh out of this race, he’s just that good. As for who will win it, I would very much like to see The Kids Are All Right pick this one up, or if not then Christopher Nolan as a sort of apology from the Academy for not even nominating him for Best Director. But, most likely, this one will end up firmly in the hands of David Seidler.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • 127 Hours (written by Danny Boyle and Simon Beaufoy, based on the book by Aron Ralston)
  • The Social Network (written by Aaron Sorkin, based on the book by Ben Mezrich)
  • Toy Story 3 (written by Michael Arndt, based on the story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich)
  • True Grit (written by Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, based on the novel by Charles Portis)
  • Winter’s Bone (written by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini, based on the novel by Daniel Woodrell)

As I said in my predictions, Winter’s Bone was going to put up a fight to be honored in this category. In my predictions I had The Town listed instead of Debra Granik’s film, but, as I’ve already said, the Academy shout-out the Ben Affleck film outside of Jeremy Renner’s nod, so no love here either. I like Debra Granik’s script better though (had it 6th in my Best Screenplays of 2010 list, while The Town was 15th), so I’m happy about it. Still, there’s no way Aaron Sorkin is losing this one, but then again I said the same thing about Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner’s script for Up in the Air last year.

BEST ART DIRECTION

  • Alice in Wonderland
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I
  • Inception
  • True Grit
  • The King’s Speech

Very very good bunch of nominees here, the only film I could have seen making the cut and still be happy about it would have been Shutter Island, but nevertheless, this will be a very cool race. I’m hoping Inception will prevail here, though Alice in Wonderland may have something to say about that and, if it turns out to be a sweep, so may The King’s Speech.

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Black Swan
  • Inception
  • The King’s Speech
  • The Social Network
  • True Grit

If I would have to guess, I’d say True Grit will win this one. However, it was amazing to see Black Swan get listed here, though I would have liked to see The King’s Speech miss out on this race in favor of the wonderful job by the 127 Hours guys.

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

  • Alice in Wonderland
  • Io Sono l’Amore
  • The King’s Speech
  • The Tempest
  • True Grit

As I said in my review for The Tempest, you can never count any Julie Taymor film out of the Best Costume Design race (all four of her films have now been nominated), but still, this one will most likely go to Alice in Wonderland. Cool to see Io Sono l’Amore get a nod here, too.

BEST EDITING

  • 127 Hours
  • Black Swan
  • The Fighter
  • The King’s Speech
  • The Social Network

Out of the technical categories, Best Editing is the one that foretells the Best Picture winner the most, so this one is one we should pay close attention to. Since the award was introduced nearly eight decades ago, only nine films have won Best Picture without being nominated here. Which I guess also goes to explain why Crash trumped over Brokeback Mountain. But still, the two Best Picture front-runners are here, so seeing who wins may be decisive as to who takes Best Picture. My vote goes to The Social Network here, and I still can’t fathom why Inception wasn’t named.

BEST MAKEUP

  • Barney’s Version
  • The Way Back
  • The Wolfman

They failed to recognize Alice in Wonderland in this one somehow, so I’m guessing this one’s definitely The Wolfman‘s.

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

  • 127 Hours (composed by A.R. Rahman)
  • Inception (composed by Hans Zimmer)
  • The Social Network (composed by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross)
  • The King’s Speech (composed by Alexandre Desplat)
  • How to Train Your Dragon (composed by John Powell)

Usual suspects in this one. Awesome to see Reznor and Ross up for this one, and they’re definitely my favorites to end up picking the award. However, Alexandre Desplat gets his fourth nomination with this one and still hasn’t won, so if The King’s Speech ends up owning the show he could win. However, Hans Zimmer’s score for Inception, which is all sorts of mind-blowing, may end up getting the win if the Academy feels it didn’t bestow enough nominations love towards the film, he hasn’t won an Oscar since The Lion King in 1995, despite being nominated 6 additional times since.

BEST SONG

  • If I Rise (from 127 Hours)
  • Coming Home (from Country Strong)
  • I See the Light (from Tangled)
  • We Belong Together (from Toy Story 3)

I honestly don’t know who will end up with the win here. All I know is that I’m happy no songs from Burlesque were named here.

BEST SOUND

  • Inception
  • The King’s Speech
  • Salt
  • The Social Network
  • True Grit

This is the one category that had most prediction experts baffled. Everyone predicted a maximum of 11 nominations for The King’s Speech, and this is the one nobody imagined, and the one that showed us just how much the Academy loved the film. As strange as it may sound, a Sound nomination is what really let us know that it was the front-runner.

BEST SOUND EDITING

  • Inception
  • Toy Story 3
  • TRON: Legacy
  • True Grit
  • Unstoppable

I really liked seeing TRON: Legacy here, and I was sure that The Social Network would get a nod here, but out of nowhere came Unstoppable and made the cut. Still, a cool and eclectic bunch.

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

  • Alice in Wonderland
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I
  • Hereafter
  • Inception
  • Iron Man 2

I expected TRON: Legacy to make the cut here, but at least it got a Sound Editing nod so it didn’t go unmentioned. Still, if Inception loses this race the Oscars will have lost all credibility to me.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • Biutiful (from Mexico)
  • Dogtooth (from Greece)
  • In a Better World (from Denmark)
  • Incendies (from Canada)
  • Outside the Law (from Algeria)

This one’s always very tough to predict. But hopefully Biutiful will end up with the trophy.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

  • How to Train Your Dragon
  • L’Illusionniste
  • Toy Story 3

This one isn’t a race at all, Toy Story 3 will win this one hands down.

BEST DOCUMENTARY

  • Exit Through the Gift Shop
  • Inside Job
  • Gasland
  • Waste Land
  • Restrepo

No Waiting for Superman? Yeah, very very weird. Same with the lack of Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer. Still Inside Job would be a very cool winner, as would be Exit Through the Gift Shop, especially if we somehow get a Banksy appearance.

Toy Story 3

22 Jul

Title: Toy Story 3
Year: 2010
Director: Lee Unkrich
Writer: Michael Arndt, from a story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
Starring: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Ned Beatty, Don Rickles, Michael Keaton, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Estelle Harris, John Morris, Jodi Benson, Laurie Metcalf, Blake Clark, Whoopi Goldberg
MPAA Rating: G
Runtime: 103 min
Major Awards: 1 Golden Globe, 1 NBR Award, 1 BAFTA
IMDb Rating: 9.0
Rotten Tomatoes: 99%

This was one of five or so most highly anticipated films of all year to pretty much everyone I talked to, and the expectations were seriously high, the second sequel to a legendary franchise that started the biggest animation studio there is, which on top of that hasn’t made a single bad film yet, and trust me when I say they didn’t break that streak with this one, Pixar is still batting a perfect 1.000, all of their films have been commercial and critical hits and Toy Story 3 is the latest of them all, yet another masterpiece that blends comedy and adventure and a helluva lot of deep emotions, especially during the end that left me spilling a few tears, and it mixes them seemingly effortlessly.

Toy Story has been of special impact in my life, I was four years old when the first one came out, eight when the sequel came out and now eighteen with this one, by this I mean that I am of the same generation as the film’s toy owner, Andy, and I still have all my action figures from the first films in my room, with my name scribbled in black sharpie in their feet, just like Andy did in the films, I have grown up with these toys at the same time as Andy, and this was a film I wouldn’t have been okay with if it ended up being anything less than perfect, thankfully Pixar didn’t disappoint me, but then again, it’s not like they ever have.

Toy Story as a franchise is one that spans fifteen years, three films, over a billion and a half dollars in worldwide grosses and counting, an Academy Award and pretty much another guaranteed this year, and was arguably the one responsible for starting the whole animation film business that has been dominating the box office since, it’s a franchise that has marked the lives of many, one that has made us laugh a lot and cry a lot in the process, and one franchise that was made with a lot of love from the best people in the industry, and one that exudes just as much love to us the audience. And I could go on and on for thousands of words about the impact Toy Story and Pixar has had on my life, but that’s for another day, here I have to review Toy Story 3 and I’ll take just as much joy out of doing that.

In this third and closing act of the franchise Andy is, as I said, at the age when you have to leave home and go to college, and like so many guys his age at the point of their lives, his mother tells him to sort out his stuff, especially the toys we all know and love, which have been kept away in his room for some years now. But Andy loves his toys, especially Woody whom he initially wants to take to college with him, but the other toys however are scrambled up and accidentally sent to a daycare as donations. Woody obviously ends up going with them, but unlike the other toys he knows Andy wanted to keep them in the attic until he returned and would later give them to his kids, the other toys, thinking Andy actually wanted to get rid of them aren’t feeling that much love towards him in the daycare and just want to be played with by the kids there.

And that’s when we meet the other toys at the daycare, who are led by a fluffy huggable pink bear named Lotso, who at first appears to be super friendly but is actually an evil and sad dictator of the daycare, with most of the toys under his spell and command. And that’s the main plot, our beloved toys fighting to get out of the daycare and rule of Lotso, all of this is told with the typical care and humor of Pixar, with a great script by Michael Arndt who’s only other screenplay was the one for Little Miss Sunshine, which earned him an Oscar. The new characters in Toy Story 3 are as endearing as the original ones, I missed Bo Peep quite a bit but there are a lot of great new characters to keep us just as entertained, because that’s what this film does throughout, entertain, the hour and forty minutes pass you by really quickly, not to mention the customary short shown before the film, Day & Night, is a great as every other short Pixar has put out.

After the toys break out of the daycare center they suffer through a scary event, and you know that will turn out having a happy ending but it really is frightening to watch, and the ending of the movie is a happy affair, but it’s one filled with a lot of nostalgia and emotions that you can relate to and that really struck a nerve to every single audience member in the theatre I went to, and yes, tears were shed, but at least you have those 3D glasses to hide them under, finally those served a purpose, because the 3D in this one is as unnecessary as it always is, but still, this is a masterpiece, appreciate it as such.

Grade: A+